Moh Maya Money movie review: An apt film in these times of demonetisation

Moh Maya Money movie review: Munish Bhardwaj’s debut film nails a certain sector of the national capital with an unerring eye, and gives us two very Delhi creatures.

Rating: 2 out of 5
Written by Shubhra Gupta | New Delhi | Published:November 25, 2016 3:52 pm
Moh Maya Money movie review, Moh Maya Money review, Moh Maya Money Moh Maya Money movie review: Ranvir Shorey, Neha Dhupia-starrer is shaping up to be a fine thriller, with characters hiding their real selves beneath masks.

Moh Maya Money movie cast: Ranvir Shorey, Neha Dhupia, Vidushi Mehra, Anant Raina
Moh Maya Money movie director: Munish Bhardwaj

Aman (Ranvir Shorey) is a young, hungry real-estate agent who wants it all, and doesn’t care what he has to do to get it. His wife Divya (Vidushi Mehra) works in news television and is working through her own personal and professional compulsions.

Munish Bhardwaj’s debut feature ‘Moh Maya Money’ is set in Delhi, nailing a certain sector of the Capital with an unerring eye, and giving us these two very Delhi creatures: there are hundreds of Amans you can encounter, working several hustles on the side, juggling so many balls at the same time that they are in the danger of forgetting that they can trip and fall anytime. And there are so many Divyas too, trying to balance stresses at work and home and a marriage which has begun creaking.

The film also feels very apt, in these tough times of demonetisation, with its leitmotif of greed — all that unaccounted for money that Aman covets has been washed through the complicated innards of the real-estate business, where the difference between black and white blurs and is stark at the same time.

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When Aman tries to stitch together a deal which he feels he can’t miss, and misses by a large mile, everything starts to come apart at the seams. Up until then, Moh Maya Money is shaping up to be a fine thriller, with characters hiding their real selves beneath masks. That’s when the film begins unraveling, too, unnecessarily looping upon itself, and getting repetitive.

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Shorey is good as usual, nailing the desperation of the kind of person who feels entitled to grab what he can because that’s what he sees everyone doing. Dhupia has a strong track too. But some performances are inept. And the climax, as well as the lead-up to it, is a stretch.

It could have done with more tautness and tightness.