Kodiveeran movie review: This Sasikumar film has nothing new to offer

Kodiveeran movie review: Sasikumar's film is largely marked by stock characters and cliched conflicts that don't reflect the changing times. And Muthaiya erroneously defines gender roles.

Rating: 2 out of 5
Written by Manoj Kumar R | Chennai | Updated: December 8, 2017 3:39 pm
Kodiveeran movie review Muthaiya has treated the relationships between key characters very well.

Kodiveeran movie cast: M. Sasikumar, Mahima Nambiar, Sanusha Santhosh Shamna Kasim Poorna, Pasupathy, Vidharth
Kodiveeran movie director: M Muthaiya
Kodiveeran movie rating: 2 stars

Actor-filmmaker M. Sasikumar’s character in Kodiveeran is a fortune-teller. He is celebrated by people in and around his village as they see him as a messenger of their God. Once in a while he gets possessed by his village deity and speaks words of prophecy to those who seek to know what future holds for them.

The characters of fortune-tellers in Tamil cinema are usually treated as a trickster, corrupt, greedy or dirty. Superstar Rajinikanth’s Oorkavalan, for instance, had used a similar character as a sidekick to the villain, who exploits the superstitious belief of the village people to benefit his masters. Kodiveeran would have been one of the supporting cast in any other films. But, in director M Muthaiya’s he is the hero. The director has used the first hour of the film to take us through the religious rituals of people in rural areas of Madurai. In fact, religious practices are what guides each character’s actions in the film. All important meetings between key characters take place in the backdrop of festivals, functions or at temples.

And the women characters in Kodiveeran are no surprise. Poorna ‘s role is called Velu, who is always fuming for no apparent reason. She plays a sinister sister to an evil brother, who goes by the name of Villangam Vellaikaran (Pasupathy). She plays that regular bad female character that’s only used to give an ego boost to men in her house to commit more crimes. Or at times to persuade them to behead a fully-grown goat in one blow as to demonstrate their masculinity.

Kodiveeran’s sister Parvathy (Sanusha) is also a character that we have seen in several films in the past. The one who loves her brother more than herself and never misses a chance to heap praises on him. Or Mahima Nambiar’s character, who is Kodiveeran’s girlfriend, who gets to shake her leg in a couple of songs. Muthaiya has typecast cast woman actors in the film, whose roles confined within the four walls as men in the house go to battles.

Parvathy’s husband Subhash is an honest government official, who is hellbent on sending Villangam and his brother-in-law Adhigaaram (Inder Kumar) to jail. That puts his life and the lives of those he loves in grave danger. But, Villangam has to go through Kodiveeran, if he wants to kill Subhash.

As you can predict Kodiveeran warns Villangam to stay away from his family or face his wrath. Of course, Villangam doesn’t listen, simply because he is an egoistic badman. From then on, the film becomes a tug-of-war between two men, good and bad. They both grapple with each other to find out who is sharper and stronger between them.

Kodiveeran knows that his brother-in-law’s life is in danger, as he has provoked a sleeping monster in Villangam. But, still, he takes no precautions as he gets busy doing romance and singing duets with his girlfriend. That’s so unconvincing when we see a character that is supposed to be overwhelmed and anxious about the safety of his family breaks into a romantic song. It makes us question his love for his sister.

Muthaiya has, however, treated the relationships between key characters very well. Especially, when Kodiveeran explains a clownish relative of his as to why he can’t let him marry his sister. Instead of dismissing him as a joke, he reasons with him and tells him how much he values him. Or how a character which is jobless and a drunkard, despite his differences with his elder brother, turn against his associates who try to harm his family.

Kodiveeran is largely marked by stock characters and cliched conflicts that don’t reflect the changing times. And Muthaiya erroneously defines gender roles in the film.

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