Kavalai Vendam movie review: If you are watching this film, start worrying

Kavalai Vendam is a case study for how to make a regressive film in romantic-comedy genre

Rating: 0.5 out of 5
Written by Manoj Kumar R | Bengaluru | Updated: November 24, 2016 4:06 pm
A still from Kavalai Vendam ,latest romantic-comedy film in Tamil A still from Kavalai Vendam ,latest romantic-comedy film in Tamil

Kavalai Vendam movie cast: Jiiva, Kajal Aggarwal, Bobby Simha

Kavalai Vendam movie director: Deekay

Actor Jiiva’s new film Kavalai Vendam was supposed to be a new-age romantic comedy. Instead, it is a case study for how to make a regressive film in this genre and exposes the failure of its director to go beyond the obvious. Most of the filmmakers want to stick to tried and tested as they are weary that their films will not be appreciated by a large number of audience. And Kavalai Vendam also seems to suffer from the same flawed conviction.

Jiiva’s 2009 film Siva Manasula Sakthi was a game-changer in the romantic comedy genre in Tamil film industry. An opposites-attract movie with interesting characters, it was smart and quirky. On the other hand, Kavalai Vendam comes as an anti-climax. Peppy music album and teasers of the film had set high expectations among the audience but the film falls flat.

Director Deekay’s film aims at generating comedy by objectifying women. His characters are so bad that they don’t have any relevance in the real world. The lead actors are so loosely written that audience will find it impossible to connect with them. A good romantic comedy should be funny and smart, and should make us empathise with the characters as they go through a gamut of emotions. But here, you feel sorry for yourself for picking this movie when there is so much you could have done with your time.

Aravind (played by Jiiva) is a flirt who falls in love and marries Divya (Kajal Aggarwal). They have an argument and Divya breaks up with Aravind near a liquor outlet. She returns to his life after a long time only to seek divorce from him. He takes a blank cheque from her and puts another condition for signing the divorce papers. He wants her to live with him in his house for a week and do all the wifely duties such as cooking and cleaning. She agrees to this and the film goes south from there.

In Kavalai Vendam, it is men who always call the shot. Even at the end, when Divya goes back to Aravind, she has to apologise for leaving him in the first place. Throughout the movie, the director tries to sell a terrible idea that no matter what happens, a girl should be with her husband, even if it is not what she wants. And just in case, if she decides to live her life on her own terms, the society will ensure that it will show what is her value as a “second hand.”

Bobby Simha, a brilliant actor, probably cried tears of blood while doing this film. His talents have been depressingly wasted to boost the hero’s masculinity. Kajal’s character is so weak that she has no clarity on what she want and she does not reflect the progressive thinking of girls of today. Jiiva’s character in this film is dumb. Period. A very misguided role. Period.

Kavalai Vendam is Tamil for ‘worry not’. But as an audience, you should. This film is absolutely not recommended.