Gringo movie review: This Charlize Theron starrer is a pointless affair

Gringo movie review: So, what do we have here? Some very bad people, and two very nice, gullible ones, of opposite sex, and the right ages. Need we say more?

Rating: 1 out of 5
Written by Shalini Langer | New Delhi | Updated: March 17, 2018 12:20:47 am
Gringo review Gringo movie review: As America ponders whether it can do with some less Mexicans, clearly Mexico could do with some less Hollywood too.

Gringo movie cast: Joel Edgerton, Charlize Theron, David Oyelowo, Amanda Seyfried, Thandie Newton
Gringo movie director: Nash Edgerton
Gringo movie rating: 1 stars

For a while, as Theron has fun with her role of a stiletto-clad, red-lipsticked, foundation-caked, cleavage-armed, heartless corporate head, Gringo seems to know where it is going. Then we realise it is only going one way: to the den of yet another Mexican drug lord, via sex, lies and chopped toes. As America ponders whether it can do with some less Mexicans, clearly Mexico could do with some less Hollywood too.

The storyline, for what it is worth, is that Elaine (Theron) and Richard (Edgerton), who jointly own a firm dealing in some kind of pharmaceuticals, are up to some hanky-panky in Mexico. But now they need a partner and hence must clean their books up. The man who will be the scapegoat is the gullible Harold (Oyelowo), their errand man in Mexico. Harold considers college buddy Richard his friend, but clearly, he should know better. Harold discovers the extent of Richard’s treachery when in Mexico — while we are treated to how badly behaved he can actually be, about everything and everyone. As Elaine matches him every step of the way, the two eminently watchable stars become more and more despicable people.

Director Edgerton (Joel’s brother) has another sleazeball up his sleeve, in the form of Richard’s brother Mitch. “Once a mercenary”, he has since discovered spirituality and Haiti. And shifted base, guns and ammo, to the troubled country. If Mexico shows up in the form of crowded streets and one drug lord, some slum shacks stand in for Haiti.

Meanwhile, a guitar shop owner from another happy American town, who is called Sunny (Seyfried), is on a trip to Mexico with a sleazy boyfriend. It’s an all-paid-for trip, offered by a woman in tattoos, and the boyfriend gets enough suspicious calls to make any self-respecting adult thinking. But Sunny is too good and innocent, you see.

So, what do we have here? Some very bad people, and two very nice, gullible ones, of opposite sex, and the right ages. Need we say more?

For all the latest Entertainment News, download Indian Express App

Share your thoughts