Creature 3D movie review: Is this what poor Bipasha Basu has come to now?

The 3D in the title is positioned such that it draws your eye immediately, and you know why as soon as the film begins.

Rating: 1.5 out of 5
Written by Shubhra Gupta | New Delhi | Updated: September 13, 2014 9:50 am
(Source: Movie Still) (Source: Movie Still)

The 3D in the title is positioned such that it draws your eye immediately, and you know why as soon as the film begins. The Creature, a scaly, long-tailed lizard-type with a semi-human face and green eyes and a loud growl, swishes its tail in your face, just where your 3D dark glasses end: first generation viewers of creature-cum-horror flicks may well flinch.

As the film gets along, you realize that Vikram Bhatt has made this film for those who are not familiar with Hollywood creature features. And for those who like a bit of comforting `bhoot-pret’ hokum mixed with their blood-thirsty monsters.

If you’ve never seen such a combo before, you might get struck in a sequence or two which shows the creature charging at human beings, blood dripping from its fangs. You might want to warn them to flee because the creature is comiiiiiing!

But I’m afraid there may be very few people left who may not have seen an endless run of Spielbergian `chipkali’ films, dubbed in Hindi and other languages to boot, on some TV channel or the other. In which case, ‘Creature’, 3D or no 3D, becomes just another Vikram Bhatt flick, featuring a brave leading lady (Bipasha Basu), a second-wheel leading man (Naqvi), and a ‘professor’ with a theory ( Dev). The only thing missing is a ‘baba’ with a ‘booti’.

Some spiel is trotted out about ‘brahma-rakshasas’, cursed by Lord Brahma himself, which are freed into this planet of ours because a schmuck cleared their way in. These creatures feed upon humans, and the more they eat, the hungrier they get. Who knows this stuff? The prof, naturally, because that’s what he is there for, right?

The plot is unintentionally hilarious, involving an intrepid young woman who turns up in the forest to start a lodge, loads of extras playing chefs and petrified guests, and an alleged award-winning writer. The coming of the creature leaves a trail of dead bodies, but instead of running, our heroine declares ‘I am not going’. Drum roll.

Of course everything leads to the face-off between the creature and the girl, with a little bit of help from the guy. Bhatt bungs in a ‘praacheen mandir’ and an old rifle and bullets dunked in `holy’ water : this is Bollywood, how can we do without hocus-pocus?

My question: Is this what poor Bipasha Basu has come to now?