When Edgy Met the Ordinary

Nooran sisters give Jee ve sohneya an off key beginning post a guitar prelude and an alaap but pick it up later. This ‘sufi track’ of the album is nice, but doesn’t give us any hair-raising moment.

Written by Suanshu Khurana | Published:August 5, 2017 12:45 am
Jab Harry Met Sejal, Jab Harry Met Sejal music review, Jagga Jasoos, Highway, Pritam music composer  The album opens with Radha, a term that’s thrown around in film songs like soy sauce these days.

Film: Jab Harry Met Sejal

Composer: Pritam

Lyrics: Irshad Kamil

Jab Harry Met Sejal is Imtiaz Ali’s latest venture, and after putting his money on AR Rahman for Tamasha and Highway, which resulted in some phenomenal work, he’s gone back to Pritam — the man who gave him a bouquet of tunes in Jab We Met. The impact of the 13-track album of Jab Harry Met Sejal is varied. It’s a combination of breezy synth pop along with some standard Punjabi songs, occasional punches and some absolute debacles. Also, one wonders about Sony Music’s secrecy around not releasing almost half the soundtrack until the last day of the release. The songs are quite radio-friendly and could have hit the charts by now.

The album opens with Radha, a term that’s thrown around in film songs like soy sauce these days. Shahid Mallya’s voice and some staccato tunes on algoza and tumbi take you to the mustard fields of Punjab. The piece soon transitions into synth pop with Sunidhi Chauhan joining in. Butterfly comes from the same marquee. Dev Negi replaces Mallya here while Chauhan remains as the female voice. Nooran sisters add the fiery quality they are known for towards the end, but the piece fails as one entity. Both are alright tunes, but too puffed up without much content. This is followed by Beech beech mein, which is a retro piece and Arijit Singh and Shalmali

Kholgale try to keep up with the funk Pritam adds. Singh even attempts an Adam Levine-style falsetto over soft thumps. He seems to be listening to a lot of Maroon 5; as happy as it makes us, the song is quite forgettable. It’s here that Pritam delivers two fine pieces — Safar and Hawayein. Singh owns both the pieces that come from two different spectrums. Safar opens with some fine work on the guitar. Singh joins in as the orchestration — electric and acoustic guitar and a mechanical beat in the background. The song is precise and heady and can easily sit in Ali’s last, Tamasha. Hawayein is a soft lilt that reminds one of the classic Pritam we love sporadically. An electric guitar and synth open the piece and Singh

Singh joins in as the orchestration — electric and acoustic guitar and a mechanical beat in the background. The song is precise and heady and can easily sit in Ali’s last, Tamasha. Hawayein is a soft lilt that reminds one of the classic Pritam we love sporadically. An electric guitar and synth open the piece and Singh follows along. It’s conceptually elegant and has been executed beautifully. While one version comes with rich orchestration, Pritam shows off the melody more in the film version of the song. The orchestration changes and uses an accordion, synth and hangdrums. We liked both.

A retro guitar interlude is joined in by high energy drum beats as Pardeep Sran attempts Parinda. That he is traditionally a Punjabi folk singer, helps. The diction is spot on apart from the tad nasal tone. Pritam combines Sran’s rustic vocals with intricate riffs and drumbeats to deliver a fine track. Another version of the piece has Tochi Raina singing this one to perfection.

The only addition is Nikhil D’souza’s English chorus, which sits really well. Two sad songs follow. Nikhita Gandhi sings Ghar with her breathy vocals in place. It has a lovely indie-pop quality to it and Mohit Chauhan joins in and keeps it that way. Jonita Gandhi attempts Yaadon mein along a piano, guitar and a mandolin in the background. Her voice soars above the orchestration and hangs in there; one of her finest renditions. Nooran sisters give Jee ve

Nooran sisters give Jee ve sohneya an off key beginning post a guitar prelude and an alaap but pick it up later. This ‘sufi track’ of the album is nice, but doesn’t give us any hair-raising moment. This is followed by Phurr, and Chauhan is fantastic in it. Diplo and Tushar Joshi join in this EDM mix which is as strange as brilliantly orchestrated.

We are enjoying Pritam’s experimental phase (last being Jagga Jasoos) and are hoping for more good days. As for this album, it is a mix of brilliant and some completely ordinary tracks.

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