Saqib Saleem’s short film Aamad is a tonic for those who never understood their strict fathers, watch video

Saqib Saleem's short film 'Aamad' celebrates Father's Day, apart from raising a lot of questions. It's not essentially about answering them, but the story of a reunion of a father and son which transcends beyond frail human bonding.

Written by Dipti Sharma | New Delhi | Published:June 19, 2017 8:26 pm
Aamad's non-linear story that moves back and forth between Abhay's present and his childhood has plenty of emotions. Aamad’s non-linear story that moves back and forth between Abhay’s present and his childhood has plenty of emotions.

Is it always enough to do the right things? What happens when you forget to take your dear ones along with you on the journey towards the fulfilment of your dreams? Is your singular purpose of achieving a dream on your own terms, a mere act of selfishness? Saqib Saleem’s short film ‘Aamad’ raises a lot of questions. It’s not essentially about answering them, but the story of a reunion of a father and son which transcends beyond frail human bonding and forces you to question everything surrounding you. Is living your dream at the cost of your loved ones worth at all? It can be but it doesn’t come out with its own deluge of guilt and regrets.

Aamad’s non-linear story that moves back and forth between Abhay’s present and his childhood has plenty of emotions. Most of us have hated our fathers to a certain degree when we were put under strict discipline during our teenage years. We hated waking up early morning and following a mundane list of daily chores. Still, in the hindsight, most of us silently thank our dads for inculcating right values in us.

So, it doesn’t come as a surprise at all when Abhay hated it when he was forced by his father to learn Kathak. You find an instant connection there. Abhay is not keen on learning Kathak and shares his innermost fears and thoughts with his mother. Again, it’s a perfect metaphor of our preference of our mothers when it comes to choosing one parent. It’s also about Abhay’s strained relationship with his father. Most of us have been there. In the hindsight, Abhay finds out that his father’s strict demeanour was there to help him with all good intention. It’s also a subtle hint that we are so often blinded by the reality and why it takes us long to realise the value of small things. Nostalgia is another highlight of the story and it doesn’t fail to pull you into it. The journey from Abhay’s immature arrogance to a shift in his outlook towards his own father makes Aamad a compelling viewing. The story leaves us with Abhay crying his heart out.

“Aamad is at its essence a father-son story. Most boys, during their teenage years, have a strained relationship with their father. I remember I had one. But when we grow up, we look back and realise how much our immature behaviour must have hurt our parents. Though we seldom apologise. Aamad is the story of a son apologising to his father and correcting the mistake of his boyhood before it gets too late,” Director Neeraj Udhwani said in a statement.

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