New proposals at FTII: Academic Council approves 20% fee hike, strikes down age limit proposal

The fee hike would include tuition fee, prospectus fee and accommodation, besides the miscellaneous charges.

Written by Atikh Rashid | Pune | Updated: October 1, 2016 10:34 am

THE ACADEMIC council of the Film and Television Institute of India (FTII) shot down the unprecedented fee hike proposed by the institute’s administration by a majority vote on Friday.

The body instead opted to put into effect 20 per cent hike on the existing fee structure for all courses. This would include tuition fee, prospectus fee and accommodation, besides the miscellaneous charges.

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The body — also by a majority vote — rejected the proposal to put a maximum age limit for admissions at 25 years as proposed by the administration, which argued that students with varying ages find it difficult to adjust with one another.

Had this been implemented, it would have been ‘a first’ for the 55-year-old institute. However, now with this proposal being disposed, the practice of admitting students without any age barrier will continue. Citing objection by the auditing body, the administration had proposed to increase the fee for various courses with the hike ranging from 33 per cent to 600 per cent.

Among all courses, the Diploma in Acting was proposed to be made most expensive –6.82 lakh for a two-year course as tuition fee.

According to those who attended the meeting, all fee hike proposals, including the hostel rent, prospectus fee and tuition fee, were voted against by faculty representatives, institute alumni and student representatives though academic council president B P Singh.

“We had proposed to consider 2010 as a base year to implement 10 per cent per annum hike. The academic council stated that 2015 should be considered as base year and those who will take admission for 2017-18 academic year will pay roughly 20 per cent extra on the existing fee paid by the 2015 (now renamed as 2016 as the previous year was considered a zero year due to strikes) batch,” said Kainthola.

Another move, which was approved with changes, was pertaining to outsourcing of the entrance examination. The administration had proposed to outsource the “complete process of entrance examination” citing difficulty in conducting and coordinating the strenuous process.