Law college aspirants in Mumbai can now avail of extra classes to help prepare for University of Mumbai exams

New Law School is planning extra classes for students once the admissions are over.

Written by Shaun Vaz | Published:September 8, 2016 2:06 am
University of Mumbai exams, University of Mumbai, MU, Law college, law students, education, education news The Mumbai University has slated the semester examinations for first year students of the three-year and five-year law courses for the end of November and early December. (Source: mu.ac.in)

Amid growing concerns among law college aspirants over admissions being delayed, the University of Mumbai’s examination schedule has only added to their problems. Coming to their rescue, some law colleges in the city have planned extra classes to help aspirants be prepared for the examinations.

The university has slated the semester examinations for first year students of the three-year and five-year law courses for the end of November and early December.

With admissions yet to begin, the city law colleges are faced with the task of fitting a stipulated 90 working-day semester into less than a month of classes.

To counter the shortage of days, University National Law School, in collaboration with the Citizen’s Forum for Change, will be conducting counselling sessions and lectures for first-year aspirants who are awaiting admissions. The free courses will be made available to both LLB and BLS aspirants, with the objective to complete selected topics before the Diwali vacations come about.

“Considering lectures will formally begin in November, we are left with less than 30 teaching days to complete the syllabus. There is obviously going to be a shortage of time to cover the portion,” said U K Nambiar, principal of a law college in Navi Mumbai. K C Law College, too, is mooting a similar set of classes for interested applicants who are still awaiting admissions.

“We are planning to start classes for interested students. The classes will cover the basic foundation for four subjects, we plan to start right away,” said Sunita Khariwal, principal of K C Law College.

“The duration between aspirants graduating from high school and the tentative admission dates is too large. Many students will lose touch with their studies and the classes will help them cope. The classes would last till formal lectures begin,” she said.

Meanwhile, New Law School is planning extra classes for students once the admissions are over.

Principal Narayan Rajadhyaksha said, “Aspirants may not attend lectures at

present owing to the uncertainty of their admissions. However, we are considering conducting extra classes once lectures commence.”

“The scheduling of professors, many of whom are practicing lawyers, for extra lectures will also prove problematic,” said Rajadhyaksha.

“We are considering the scrapping of Diwali vacations, owing to the already tight schedule. This will open up some time for conducting extra lectures, and will be beneficial to the students.”

The only reprieve lies in the possibility of the scheduled dates of the examinations being pushed back, which, according to Rajadhyaksha — a former member of the examination board of MU — is “very high.”