ITI admissions begin, rising applicants may outnumber seats

In the past two years, the number of candidates applying for skill development courses has seen a spike of 14.64 per cent, and enrolment figures have improved by 8.02 per cent.

Written by Priyanka Sahoo | Mumbai | Published:June 20, 2017 3:08 am
ITI Admissions Mumbai, Industrial Training Institutes admissions, Directorate of Vocational Education and Training, Vocational Courses, Education News, Indian Express News The intake capacity last year was around 1.25 lakh, a 2.23 per cent increase from the year 2015-16. (Representational Image)

AS admissions to Industrial Training Institutes (ITIs) begin, the increased intake capacity may still fall short for the rising number of applicants. In the past two years, the number of candidates applying for skill development courses has seen a spike of 14.64 per cent, and enrolment figures have improved by 8.02 per cent. However, compared to the increase in demand for these courses, the intake capacity has been increased by only 5.9 per cent.

The Directorate of Vocational Education and Training (DVET) flagged off the online admission process on Monday, where those interested in vocational courses can apply to 1.33 lakh seats in ITIs across the state. The intake capacity last year was around 1.25 lakh, a 2.23 per cent increase from the year 2015-16.

“Some courses are for two years. In such courses, we increase batch sizes every alternate year,” said Yogesh Patil, deputy director of DVET, adding that the intake capacity is decided after consulting industry experts.

The DVET determines the intake capacity each year with an eye at the industries and sectors where the demand for skilled labour is high, said Patil. “While deciding the intake capacity, we ensure that the exact number of apprenticeship opportunities are available,” said Patil.

ITIs offer vocational and industrial training that help students enhance their skills and seek jobs in these sectors. The courses are available to anyone who has studied till Class X and may not have passed the Senior Secondary Certificate exam.

Over the past few years, the DVET has made efforts to introduce unconventional courses such as Fashion Technology and Cosmetology. However, the traditional courses in masonry, welding and fitting remain the most sought-after.

“Certain courses haven’t taken off. Some students take up the course when they don’t get admission to a desired course and drop out midway. There is also a lack of awareness,” said John Almeida, principal of Joseph Cardijn Technical Private Industrial Training Centre in Dadar.

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