In DU, students from out of town share their worries

For them the first day of college was not only about getting familiar with the space but also about learning a new language, adjusting to food habits, people and managing studies alongside work.

Written by Shradha Chettri , Aranya Shankar | New Delhi | Updated: July 21, 2017 1:56:37 pm
“Communicating with people in Hindi will be difficult, so will be getting accustomed to the cuisine.” (Express Photo)

On Thursday, students freshly out of school, from across the country, assembled at Delhi University to attend the orientation programme, and the first day of classes. While for those who have grown up in Delhi the space seemed familiar, for others coming from different parts of the country, Thursday brought with it their entry into a new world. For them – who have left their families behind and have travelled thousands of kilometres away from home, in most cases for the first time — the first day of college was not only about getting familiar with the space but also about learning a new language, adjusting to food habits, people and managing studies alongside work.

With these challenges in tow, they are hopeful that the university will help them fulfil their dreams. View | Delhi University: On Day 1, some curiosity, selfies and street play.

MEENA COIMBATORE, TAMIL NADU

Meena has enrolled in BCom (Hons) at Shri Ram College of Commerce. Having scored 99.42% in her board exams, she got admission in the first list. Last month, she travelled to Delhi for the first time — to take admission. Meena realised her challenges once she entered her PG in Kamla Nagar. “Communicating with people in Hindi will be difficult, so will be getting accustomed to the cuisine. I hope I understand in the language soon,” said Meena.

UMME ZEHRA SADAH FATEHPUR, UTTAR PRADESH

Although Sadah was getting admission in various day colleges, she took admission in Hindi Hons at Satyawati (Evening) so that juggle work with studies. “I don’t come from a financially sound background. My father was a government school teacher but he was terminated. My mother is a homemaker. So, we have no source of income. I will try to provide schoolchildren tuition to fund my education. If that does not work out, I’m ready to work as a salesperson at a mall as well,” said Sadah, who is paying a monthly rent of Rs 8,000 at her PG.

SHIVANI BRAHMA GUWAHATI, ASSAM When she entered her college — Shaheed Bhagat Singh College — on Wednesday, Brahma was surprised by how open and welcoming her peers were. “In Guwahati, people are more reserved. Here, people were so friendly. I had not expected this but I am inspired,” said the student of Political Science (Hons). However, she is apprehensive about the “high cost of living in Delhi”. “My PG costs Rs 7,500 per month with additional charges for laundry and electricity. But it’s not just that, everything is so expensive here — from vegetables to photocopy shops,” said Brahma.

NARENDRA KUMAR HANUMANGARH, RAJASTHAN

Kumar has enrolled in Physics (Hons) at Hansraj College. With a score of 94.66%, he got admitted in the fifth list. He came to Delhi a few days ago with his grandfather Kishan Lal and father Dilip and is the first in the family who has travelled so far to study. Though Kumar is happy to be in Hansraj, he is apprehensive about how well he can adjust to a new city as well as the college. “Today, I could just make one friend, but I hope more people become friends with me. Also I need to figure out a place to live,” said the boy who is now living at a dharamshala.

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