134 fewer seats for general students: Seats reduced, race for place in Faculty of Law turns tougher

Earlier this year, the BCI had said the university cannot admit more than 1,440 students and that the university must comply with the legal Education Rules, 2008, and put a cap on the number of students.

Written by Shradha Chettri | New Delhi | Published:July 10, 2017 1:41 am
Delhi University, DU Law Faculty, Delhi High Court, DU Campus Law Centre, DU seats, DU seats for general students This year, there will be 1,033 seats for general category students, down from 1,167 last year. Archive

STUDENTS VYING for seats in Delhi University’s Law Faculty have a tough competition ahead. Unlike previous years, the total number of 2,310 seats this year is inclusive of the supernumerary ones, reserved for students with physical disabilities, children of war widows and foreign nationals, as per a notification issued by the university on July 7. Hence, there will be only be 1,033 seats for general category students this year.

Earlier, the 2,310 seats were meant for students in the unreserved category as well as Scheduled Castes (SC), Scheduled Tribes (ST) and Other Backward Classes (OBC). Besides, there were 310 supernumerary seats. The notification comes days after the contention between the Bar Council of India (BCI) and the Delhi University Law Faculty ended with the Delhi High Court permitting the varsity to admit 2,310 students this academic session as opposed to BCI’s order of admitting only 1,440 students.

Earlier this year, the BCI had said the university cannot admit more than 1,440 students and that the university must comply with the legal Education Rules, 2008, and put a cap on the number of students. With the case reaching the Delhi High Court, the university was allowed to admit 2,310 students for the LLB programme. The university gives 27 per cent reservation for OBC students, 15 per cent for SC students, 7.5 per cent for ST students, 3 per cent for people with disabilities, 5 per cent for children of war widows and 5 per cent for foreign nationals.

Hence, this year, there will be 1,033 seats for general category students as against 1,167 till last year. Subsequently, with this reduction of seats for unreserved category, even those in the reserved category will face a slash in the numbers. For OBCs, the number of seats have been reduced from 623 to 552, for SCs, from 347 to 307 and for STs, it is 153 from the 173 seats last year. A senior university official said that the decision has been taken since the “High Court order allowed us to admit 2,310 and we cannot go beyond it”. “Since a cap was put, we had to abide by it. This is much better than the BCI cap of 1,440, which would have led to reduction of more seats,” said an university official on condition of anonymity.

However, there are no details on how the seats will be divided between the three centres — the Campus Law Centre, Law Centre-I and Law Centre-II. “Last year, the university had advertised for 2,310+310 seats but the university never specified what happened in the end. Last year, during admissions, there was so much problem that we really couldn’t find it out,” said Gorav Arora, second year student of LC-I. Last year too, after the entrance test was conducted, the BCI had said that the university cannot admit more than 1,440 students. Students had then protested, sat on hunger strike and moved the court.

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