Targeting Neglected Diseases

International experts and representatives of the Indian government,along with global health organisations,recently gathered in Delhi for a conference titled “Partnering for Success – Reducing India’s Burden of Neglected Diseases

Written by EXPRESS FEATURES SERVICE | Pune | Published:September 11, 2013 2:06 am

Targeting Neglected Diseases

International experts and representatives of the Indian government,along with global health organisations,recently gathered in Delhi for a conference titled “Partnering for Success – Reducing India’s Burden of Neglected Diseases.” Experts from various fields of medicine comprised panels that examined the need to understand the economic and social burden of neglected disease,how to reach the poorest and most marginalised,and how to increase research and development capacity. In 2012,the World Health Organisation established targets for the control and elimination of 10 neglected tropical diseases by 2020. Governments around the world — working in partnership with civil society organisations and the pharmaceutical industry — have joined in a global coordinated effort to meet this challenge. The conference on Reducing India’s Burden of Neglected Diseases is being convened by Global Health Progress (GHP),Organisation of Pharmaceutical Producers of India (OPPI) and International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers & Associations (IFPMA).

Milk Made<\b>

Among other issues discussed at the third National Health Writers and Editors Convention,doctors discussed concerns over milk safety and nutrition for children. Experts reviewed a recently conducted study that highlighted a low level of awareness among Indian mothers on the relation between boiling the milk and loss of nutrition. An entire session was devoted to “Milk in the New Millennium – Innovative Dairy Technology and Child Health,”. According to the study conducted by Tetra Pak,in collaboration with research-based agency Millward Brown,only 17 per cent of mothers believed that boiling the milk affects its nutritional properties; 59 per cent felt that boiling increases the milk’s nutritional value; while 24 per cent felt it does not impact its nutritional properties. Dr Kalpesh Date,a pediatrician and neonatologist,said,“Most Indian mothers are unaware that prolonged and repeated boiling of milk leads to loss in nutrition. Vitamins and proteins are destroyed when milk is boiled at temperatures above 100º C for over 15 minutes. Yet,in a majority of households,milk is boiled more than thrice,skimmed,and hence deprived of most of the essential vitamins,proteins,amino acids and minerals.”

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