Smart city 2016: Zero garbage model key to a clean, smart city

The change is in the system for household and commercial property waste, and complete integration of waste-pickers into door-to-door services.

Pune | Updated: December 27, 2015 5:38 am
Arun Firodia Arun Firodia

The PMC, which is in charge of the civic needs and infrastructure of the metropolis, finds it difficult to cope with the problems of rising population. The problem of disposal of solid waste has assumed huge proportions. Realising the gravity of the situation, PMC got together the various stakeholders to find an innovative solution to the problem of solid waste management. A pilot solid waste management project at Katraj was undertaken in association with Janwani.

The Zero Garbage Ward model at Katraj resulted in cleaner streets, segregation at the primary collection centre and increased door-to-door waste collection coverage. Wet waste is processed within the ward thereby reducing transportation cost and saving money. Since minimum garbage is sent outside the ward, the name “Zero Garbage”. Reducing the garbage sent outside the ward by processing it within the ward itself has to be primary objective.

Stakeholders in the Zero Garbage Model Janwani partnered with the PMC, waste-picker cooperative SWaCH, Cummins India and others to develop and implement the model. Cummins India was the financial backbone of the project. The public-private partnership developed a new system for waste management in the city that decentralises solid waste management and incorporates waste-pickers — members of society that pick through trash for plastics to sell – into the formal system. In the new system, the municipal corporation continues its duties, including street-sweeping and industrial waste collection.

The change is in the system for household and commercial property waste, and complete integration of waste-pickers into door-to-door services.

Zero Garbage Project at Katraj helped achieve a better and cleaner Katraj with lesser incidence of diseases. Other achievements in the ward include 90 per cent of households being covered by door-to-door collection, 70 per cent of households in the ward providing segregated waste, 100 per cent door-to-door collection, 100 per cent segregation of wet (organic) and dry (plastics, glass, paper, metal, etc.) at the source level. The PMC, having implemented the model successfully, has now decided to replicate the same in other wards with the objective of making Pune clean.

Arun Firodia is chairman Kinetic Group and member, Governing Board, Janwani

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