Rules of Stardom

Sharman Joshi’s journey to his first solo lead role is fuelled by his policy of doing the kind of cinema that he enjoys

Written by PriyankaPereira | Published: June 2, 2012 1:25 am

Sharman Joshi’s journey to his first solo lead role is fuelled by his policy of doing the kind of cinema that he enjoys

Sharman Joshi has acted in 15 films in 13 years. Going by Bollywood standards,that’s a measly number for any actor. But he seems to have managed pretty well. His apt choice of roles,his camaraderie with top-notch filmmakers and co-stars,apart from his inherent talent,have helped him carve a niche for himself. “People around me are always concerned about me not doing too many films. But one must understand that this is an extraordinary journey as an actor and to make it worthwhile will take time. When I hang my boots or possibly die,I want to be a part of 10 such films that would be considered among the best in Indian cinema,” says Joshi.

Adding to his filmography is Rajesh Mapuskar’s Ferrari Ki Sawaari,a social satire that releases on June 15. The film is aimed at a wide audience,ranging from the age group of seven to 70. This,incidentally,is also a first for Joshi as the solo lead. Owing to his sharp features,especially his nose,Joshi was approached to play a Parsi character. “Of all the characters I have played,this is completely out of my skin. So I had to work doubly hard on getting the nuances of the character right. I worked on my stance,clothes,accent (which we eventually did not use) and also met a few other Parsis,” says the 33-year-old.

All this seems to have paid off,at least for the time being. The promos have received positive responses. For Joshi,the high point of this film is its focus on fatherhood. “In Bollywood,there have been plenty of films on motherhood and the mother-son or mother-daughter relationship. We are focussing on grandfather-father-son relationship and the lengths to which a father can go to fulfill the wishes of his child,” says Joshi,who has a daughter and twin sons. However,he seems to make a clear demarcation between his personal and professional life. None of his fatherly emotions from his real life are transformed on screen or vice versa.

Joshi’s strength as an actor has been his ability to translate each character onto the screen with utmost ease. From playing the straight-faced Karsan in Godmother,the funny Bantu in Style,rustic-yet-loveable Sukhi in Rang De Basanti,the confused-in-love Rahul in Life in a Metro or the emotional Raju Rastogi in 3 Idiots,Joshi’s performance have always managed to strike a chord. This,he believes,comes from the fact that he does his roles only after he is completely convinced of them. Joshi is not averse to slapstick comedies or romcoms,a genre often run down by critics. His only criteria being they should be entertaining. “Several actors sign the films first and then crib about the quality of the film. I work differently,and this works best for me,” he says.

In the recent past,when Joshi got more selective with his projects,there was a constant buzz that he was getting too snooty with his approach to work. However,Joshi puts it to rest when he says,“My fears are not as simple as you put them to be. I just don’t believe in repeating myself in a film that I have already done earlier. When I did Golmaal,I enjoyed it. But I did not think there was anything more to be done with the character. Hence,I stepped out of the sequel.”

Joshi’s next is a romantic drama directed by Tanuja Chandra,again a new genre for him. He doesn’t fear the circumstances of constant experimentation. “If I believe in something,I need to back myself. In a worst case scenario,I will be reduced to an unemployed actor on the streets. But in the best scenario,I will be doing one wonderful film after another,” says the actor.

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