Rhythm of Life

Artist Ravhi Songirkaar says his paintings create a new world through lines and spots,and a viewer has to make his own story out of what he sees

Written by Rushil Dutta | Published:August 27, 2013 5:17 am

An art director with an advertisement firm,Ravhi Songirkaar is not new to visual arts. Having done several group and solo shows over the last four years,Songirkaar — who is now exhibiting his works at an exhibition titled “Natural Rhythms” in the city — says his inspiration comes from the regular events of life. “These events may occur in nature,or in cities or in the countryside. I can’t help but notice a rhythm in life,” he says.

The works he has put on display in Pune have been rendered in three mediums: abstract art in charcoal and oil,realist city scapes in oil and water colours,and landscapes in oil. His theme permeates through all mediums and manifests itself realistically with subjects and imagery.

“Elements like lines in the surroundings — be it wires running overhead or tree trunks — inspire and fascinate me. I pick up these ubiquitous motifs and incorporate my mood into it to produce my works,” says Songirkaar. The definition of form in these paintings is common. “One might wonder how my theme can inspire abstract artwork,which I have rendered with charcoal and highlighted with oil paints,” says the artist.

Going to illustrate this with an example,he says,“If one is out there amid nature and looking at its wonders closely,one can easily notice tall grass swaying with the wind,which creates a wave on its surface. That is an outstanding example of the ‘rhythm’ I’m talking about. I might choose to represent this phenomenon realistically or using abstract imagery and symbolism. Similarly,there are intricate patterns formed by tree branches,which result in such abstract patterns.”

Songirkaar also adds that his subjects are “unique”. “Most artists prefer drawing still subject. In the case of my paintings,I have deliberately used moving and fluid subjects to emphasise on my theme,” he says. He adds,“These moving subjects are very hard to capture on canvas. The best example of this would be a woman riding a two-wheeler on a busy street. There is so much movement. There is an added challenge in painting such subjects.”

The exhibition is on display at Bliss Art Gallery till September 14

For all the latest Cities News, download Indian Express App

    Express Adda