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New study blames obesity, diabetes on ancestors’ diet

12-year-old study shows middle-class in developing countries more susceptible.

Written by Anuradha Mascarenhas | Pune | Updated: July 14, 2015 3:32 am

 

obesity, diabetics, ancestor diet, University of Sydney,National Centre for Cell Science, KEM hospital, health,   poor dietary habits, pune news, city news, local news, pune newsline, Indian Express Anandwardhan A. Hardikar, associate professor at the University of Sydney, along with researchers from Pune-based National Centre for Cell Science, KEM Hospital and D Y Patil Medical College, have presented the findings in July 10 online edition of Cell Metabolism.

Poor diet followed by ancestors is among the reasons why people in India and other developing countries are more susceptible to obesity, type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

Anandwardhan A. Hardikar, associate professor at the University of Sydney, along with researchers from Pune-based National Centre for Cell Science, KEM Hospital and D Y Patil Medical College, have presented the findings of their study, “Multi-generational Undernutrition and Diabetes”, in the July 10 online edition of journal Cell Metabolism.

The 12-year-old study shows that the middle-class in developing countries is more susceptible than western Caucasians to obesity, type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases because of their ancestors’ poor dietary habits.

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While Hardikar, the lead scientist in the study, was unavailable for comment, Dr Sarang Satoor, a scientist at National Centre for Cell Science and co-author of the study, told The Indian Express that the findings could explain the projections that more than 70 per cent of the global burden of type-2 diabetes will fall on people from developing countries by 2030.

The research team, which also included professor Mahesh Karandikar from D Y Patil Medical College, conducted the study of two groups of rats. The first was undernourished for 50 generations and then put on a normal diet for two generations. The second maintained a normal diet for 52 generations. The study found that when the descendants of the first group were exposed to a normal diet, this did not reverse the epigenetic modifications made by their undernourished forebears. These rats were eight times more likely to develop diabetes and multiple metabolic defects as compared to the second group. “Their adverse metabolic state was not reversed by two generations of nutrient recuperation through a normal diet,” Hardikar says in the study. “Instead, this newly prosperous population favoured storage of excess nutrients as fat, leading to increased obesity, cardiovascular diseases and metabolic risk for diabetes when compared to their ‘developed world’ counterparts.”

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  1. Rebecca Torres
    Jul 14, 2015 at 7:31 pm
    I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and put on Metformin on June 26th, 2014. I started the ADA diet and followed it 100% for a few weeks and could not get my blood sugar to go below 140. Finally i began to panic and called my doctor, he told me to get used to it. He said I would be on metformin my w life and eventually insulin. At that point i knew something wasn't right and began to do a lot of research. On April 13th I found this book on . I read the book from end to end that night because everything the writer was saying made absolute sense. I started the diet that day and the next morning my blood sugar was down to 100, the next day was in the 90's and now i have a fasting blood sugar between Mid 70's and the 80's. My doctor took me off the metformin after just one week of being on this lifestyle change. I have lost over 30 pounds in a month. I now work out twice a day and still have tons of energy. I have lost 6 inches around my waist and I am off my high blood pressure medication too. I have about 20 more pounds to go till my body finds its ideal weight. The great news is, this is a lifestyle I can live with, it makes sense and it works. God Bless the writer. I wish the ADA would stop enabling consumers and tell them the truth. You can get off the drugs, you can help yourself, but you have to have a correct lifestyle and diet. No more processed foods. Good article.
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    1. Rebecca Torres
      Jul 14, 2015 at 7:31 pm
      I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and put on Metformin on June 26th, 2014. I started the ADA diet and followed it 100% for a few weeks and could not get my blood sugar to go below 140. Finally i began to panic and called my doctor, he told me to get used to it. He said I would be on metformin my w life and eventually insulin. At that point i knew something wasn't right and began to do a lot of research. On April 13th I found this book on wje592/i-am-finally-free-of-diabetes/. I read the book from end to end that night because everything the writer was saying made absolute sense. I started the diet that day and the next morning my blood sugar was down to 100, the next day was in the 90's and now i have a fasting blood sugar between Mid 70's and the 80's. My doctor took me off the metformin after just one week of being on this lifestyle change. I have lost over 30 pounds in a month. I now work out twice a day and still have tons of energy. I have lost 6 inches around my waist and I am off my high blood pressure medication too. I have about 20 more pounds to go till my body finds its ideal weight. The great news is, this is a lifestyle I can live with, it makes sense and it works. God Bless the writer. I wish the ADA would stop enabling consumers and tell them the truth. You can get off the drugs, you can help yourself, but you have to have a correct lifestyle and diet. No more processed foods. Good article.
      (0)(0)
      Reply
      1. M
        Marcia Higgins
        Jul 14, 2015 at 3:56 am
        I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and put on Metformin on May 21st, 2014. I started the ADA diet, using it as directed 100% for weeks – still my blood glucose did not get below 140. I questioned my doctor about my options and he said I would be on metformin the rest of my life – until moving to insulin. Meds were the only option he gave me. Then, I found the Diabetes Destroyer guide ( diabetesdestrofo ) It made sense and opened my eyes to the possibility of natural diabetes treatment. I started to implement David Andrew’s methods the very next day. I’ve lost over 40 pounds and 7 inches on my waist in a month. I have more than enough energy to workout twice daily and still power through. I almost fell for the trap the pharms have set up for people like us, but I got lucky. Open your minds people and try alternative methods, these corporations are making their money from us being sick. Why would they want that to end?
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