Mural muse

With no rule book to follow,the mural workshop at ADIPA encourages free flow of creativity

Written by Anjali Jhangiani | Published:July 21, 2012 1:31 am

On reaching the bungalow at Survey no. 65 in Sopan Baug,we are gripped by a certain sense of serenity. A big mural embedded on the wall at the entrance,depicts innocence . The mural is like a sun – drawn as the way kids do – a semicircular dome with spiky rays. It leads to the walkway towards the backyard. At the end of this beautiful garden,which is full of various colourful flowering plants and floor murals,we find ADIPA studio. After passing through the baking area,with brick ovens covered with huge iron domes,we sit at our workstation for our first experience of a mural workshop.

The participants attending the workshop are a mix of Indians and expats from varied age-groups. The group is greeted by Ruby Jhunjhunwala,creative director of ADIPA,custom ceramics studio. Before beginning the workshop,she distributes generous portions of grey clay to all the participants. We are asked to knead the clay till it is extremely soft and then pat it vigorously to make a flat sheet. Jhunjhunwala tells everyone to let go of all our pent up emotions as we knead the clay. It may be anger,depression,disappointment,anxiety or any positive energy that needs to be vented out to bring about an emotional equilibrium when one kneads the clay. The host does not encourage the use of any tools during this process. Only once the clay is reasonably flat,does she hand out small rolling pins,only to make the surface smooth and even. Once done,we use our individual creativity to make different,abstract creative pieces,from a platter to cup,to a toy and more. The aim of the workshop is to encourage free flow of creativity,without any restrictions.

Real creativity is still a step away . Participants are asked to go to the garden and fetch leaves,flowers,stems,and just about anything. Everyone takes their picks and uses them to enhance the shapes they have made with the clay. Our ‘masterpieces’ are placed on the racks to dry and with this,the workshop comes to an end. Jhunjhunwala takes the responsibility of drying the models and getting them professionally painted at her studio . We take back the joy of creating something with our own hands.

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