Eminent UK scholars to converge to mark 10th anniversary of IISER

The series kicked off on January 28 and the lecture tours of each speaker would take place across six cities in India till March.

Written by Rutuja Kamble | Pune | Published:January 31, 2016 9:01 am
IISER pune759 The series kicked off on January 28 and the lecture tours of each speaker would take place across six cities in India till March.

A public lecture series titled ‘Science and Beyond’ has been organised by the British Council and IISER, Pune. The IISER has completed 10 years and to mark the occasion, it is bringing together eminent scholars, writers and historians of science from the UK for a lecture series.

“The aim is to bring science and related areas closer to society and to strengthen UK and India ties in the higher education sector,” said Gunjan Narula, Head of British Council, Pune. The series kicked off on January 28 and the lecture tours of each speaker would take place across six cities in India till March.

As part of the event, renowned Scottish geologist and president of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society, Iain Stewart, visited the city. Stewart is also a professor of Geoscience Communication at the University of Plymouth and a member of the Scientific Board of UNESCO’s International Geoscience Programme.

“In school, I was interested in being an explorer, and then in 1980, while I was studying advanced geography, the volcano mountains of St. Helen’s blew up in Washington with huge eruption,” Stewart said. He is also known as the ‘rock star’ of geology owing to his association with a television program named ‘Journeys from the center of the earth’ for which he composed rock music.

Speaking about climate change, Stewart said, “I have made a specific programme on climate change, which is one of the most important topics now. The question of ‘what to do about it’ is much more challenging than the science, as it is more about human behaviour.”

Stewart also delivered a lecture at IISER where he explained how 90 million years ago, India’s position was between Madagascar and Australia in the southern hemisphere, after which it broke off and moved all the way to the equator smashing into Asia.

 

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