Canvas on the Ramp-age

Rimzim Dadu’s line that was showed at the WIFW on Saturday makes it apparent that the young designer has turned to the outdoors for inspiration,her motifs had a fairytale,Alice-in-Wonderland feel to them.

Written by Georgina Maddox | Published:October 10, 2011 12:30 am

An art writer found designer Rimzim Dadu’s show touched the woman-child in her

Rimzim Dadu’s line that was showed at the WIFW on Saturday makes it apparent that the young designer has turned to the outdoors for inspiration — her motifs had a fairytale,Alice-in-Wonderland feel to them. If one were to forget the supine models wearing the garments and look only at the textured surfaces of apparel,as if they were walking paintings,then the first artist that comes to mind is Paul Klee.

Dadu’s work speaks to the woman-child in her,overflowing with an innocence and honesty that is rather beguiling. Butterflies,bows,dragonflies and flowers are the primary leitmotif that created quite a flash on the ramp with their bold palette and slightly prickly forms.

It was in fact the more austere,staid works that blended paper and fabric to emulate crushed,handmade paper ‘constructions’ that had people clapping in the aisles.

Created from crosshatched ‘paper’ strips and acrylic sheets that provided structure to the flowing fabric,they looked like abstract paintings. Dadu also used negative spaces imaginatively,creating large vacant gaps between beaded,flowing gowns.

While the acrylic and fiberglass jackets looked distinctly uncomfortable on the models,as pieces of sculpture,they had the thin clean lines of Alberto Giacometti and emulated the transparency of a Post-Modern sculptor.

Finally,we must ask was it art or craft? Dadu’s attention to fussy details definitely grounded the line in the craft terrain. However,there were a few pieces that provided the ‘Aha’ moment of sublimity that is the hallmark of good art.

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