Saturday, Nov 29, 2014

Surgeons lose count after teeth No. 232 extracted from teen’s mouth

On July 21, during a six-hour long surgery, a team of doctors removed the abnormal growth of teeth from Aashiq’s lower jaw. On July 21, during a six-hour long surgery, a team of doctors removed the abnormal growth of teeth from Aashiq’s lower jaw.
Mumbai | Posted: July 23, 2014 1:34 am

In a rare medical case, a team of doctors at state-run JJ hospital extracted as many as 232 tiny teeth from a 17-year-old boy’s mouth in a six-hour long surgery conducted on Monday. Interestingly, doctors claim that the total count of minuscule teeth was far greater than 232, after which they gave up on counting and focussed only on removing them.

Aashiq Gawai, a tenth standard boy from a remote village called Valsavangi in Buldhana district, started developing abnormally fast growing teeth, four months ago. While initially, his parents ignored the peculiar growth, tension grew when his right lower jaw started to swell.

“I did not have much money and we could not understand what was wrong with my son. We first visited a private doctor after which we went to a public hospital in Aurangabad. The doctors in Aurangabad referred us to JJ hospital, stating that it is out of their medical expertise,” said Suresh Gawai, Aashiq’s father.

Gawai, who cultivates cotton in Valsavangi, can hardly speak Hindi.  He still cannot understand the medical anomaly his son developed. With no money in his pockets, he reached Mumbai and admitted Aashiq to JJ hospital on July 1.

Later, he was informed about the Rajiv Gandhi Jeevandayee Arogya Yojana, a scheme that provides free medical treatment to poor patients, and enlisted his son under the scheme.

On July 21, during a six-hour long surgery, a team of doctors removed the abnormal growth of teeth from Aashiq’s lower jaw.

“The abnormal growth was a benign tumour. He had a normal jawline, but one molar tooth in the lower jaw had given birth to hundreds of tiny teeth. There were clusters of tooth buds in his lower jaw,” said Dr Sunanda Dhivare, head of dentistry department at JJ hospital.

The doctors in the hospital themselves admitted to having witnessed such a condition for the first time. ENT surgeon Dr Vandana Thorawade said  during the surgery, they ensured that the patient’s face symmetry did not change.

“The bone around which the tumour was attached had become brittle and thin. That was the only complication. We could not let that bone break and so we slowly removed one tooth after another,”  Thorawade added.

At present, he is on a liquid diet and should be able to eat solid food in a few days.

tabassum.barnagarwala@expressindia.com

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