Son to keep slain ASI’s promise

ASI Balasaheb Bhosale cannot fulfil the promise he made to his family that he would buy a car after his retirement. But his death at the hands of terrorists on November 26 will not put an end to his dream.

Written by Jaidev Hemmady | Mumbai | Published:January 18, 2009 1:04 am

Widow says Bhosale’s son,also a cop,will buy car for family

The acts of bravery of the policemen who laid down their lives to protect Mumbai during the 26/11 attacks have been chronicled for posterity and many,if not all,of them are expected to be honoured on the occasion of Republic Day. But most of these heroes lived ordinary lives,pursued commonplace dreams,and struggled with the tough living conditions in the financial capital.
A Newsline series takes an intimate look at how some of these policemen lived.

ASI Balasaheb Bhosale cannot fulfil the promise he made to his family that he would buy a car after his retirement. But his death at the hands of terrorists on November 26 will not put an end to his dream.

The car will come,because of a son’s desire to keep the father’s word. Talking to Newsline from their 120-sq-ft house at Naigaon police camp,Sharda (50),Bhosale’s widow says,“My son Deepak is planning to fulfil his dream. Balasaheb always used to tell us that after his retirement,he would buy a car for the family using his savings. However,my husband fell to bullets of terrorists near Cama Hospital. Deepak,also a policeman,has promised to buy the car.”

As per the family,Bhosale had a salary of Rs 15,000 per month but as he had taken a loans for the eldest son’s marriage and the medical expenses for an ailing relative,the amount Bhosale was left with after deductions was Rs 5,000.

“Because of this,we faced hardships but somehow sustained ourselves. Also,when my elder brother joined the police force,he was able to contribute to the income,” said Sachin,the younger son of Bhosale.

The small house has a colour TV,a fridge,a small bed and a cabinet to hold utensils. The mother sits on the floor feeding ‘khichdi’ to her infant grand-daughter,Aarya,who shies away from the camera. Aarya’s mother,Deepak’s wife,makes the infant sit on her lap to get clicked.

Before 26/11,Sharda,her husband and their youngest son Sachin used to stay in the flat whereas the eldest son,Deepak,used to stay with his wife and their daughter in a nearby room. “As Deepak is also a policeman,he was given his own quarters. However,when Deepak goes out for assignments — he has now gone to Pune — his wife and child stay here so that I do not feel lonely. Even Sachin has to go out in search of a job. Had it not been for Deepak’s wife and his child,I would have felt very lonely,” said Sharda.

Bhosale,an ex-army man who had seen action in the 1971 war was the driver of the jeep,supposed to carry ATS chief Hemant Karkare,ACP Ashok Kamte,encounter specialist Vijay Salaskar and others. The jeep had been ambushed by Kasab and Abu Ismail at Cama Hospital where the officers were killed by a hail of bullets.

“Every time I watch news where Kasab’s picture is flashed,my blood boils to see the man who shot my husband. He should be lynched instead of being tried by the court,” said Sharda,her voice quivering with rage and sorrow.

Deepak is now in Pune to apprehend an accused who fled after committing a crime. Sachin is in Satara to attend the funeral of a relative. Though Sharda is appreciative of the efforts by the government to help the family after Bhosale’s death,some other organisations have left her dejected.

“When the memory of the attack was fresh,many organisations had come to us promising jobs for the next of kin and other assistance. However,we have not heard from them. Sachin was promised a job by Mantralaya and also by a bank. However,nothing has come on both fronts and I have told him to keep following it up till he gets a job,” Sharda added.

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