Saturday, Oct 25, 2014

Notices served to 16.6 lakh properties for failing to segregate dry waste

The western suburbs is said to have the best segregation practices, with around 80 per cent properties complying with the norms. The western suburbs is said to have the best segregation practices, with around 80 per cent properties complying with the norms. (Reuters)
Written by Alison Saldanha | Mumbai | Posted: March 22, 2014 12:56 am

In the last one year, the BMC has served notices to over 16.6 lakh properties across Mumbai, both residential and non-residential, for failing to segregate waste at the source. Of this, 14.41 lakh notices were served to households alone, while the rest were served to non-residential structures (1.8 lakh) and other premises (38,443).

In mid-February, the BMC began services for door-to-door collection of dry waste in all wards. Data from the civic body shows that till March 20, 2014, the service has been made available to 25.9 lakh households, 2.23 lakh non-residential structures and 53,648 premises.

“In many cases, we have also served a second notice. If the respondents still fail to comply, we will start the procedure for prosecution,” said Deputy Municipal Commissioner Prakash Patil, in-charge of the solid waste management (SWM) department.

The BMC also claimed that since dry waste collection services began in mid-February, segregation was now being carried out in 75 per cent households and 65 per cent commercial properties. The western suburbs is said to have the best segregation practices, with around 80 per cent properties complying with the norms. In the eastern suburbs, data shows that segregation is being carried out in 75 per cent of the properties. Further, 65 per cent of the island city’s properties carry out segregation.

The best segregation practices are said to be in N-Ward (Ghatkopar), where 91 per cent of the properties segregate waste, while the worst segregation practices are said to be in B-Ward (Marine Lines, Dongri and Bhendi Bazaar) where only 23 per cent households and commercial establishments are in compliance.

The BMC finalised a Rs 2.2-crore contract in February 2014 for a period of one year to collect dry-waste across Mumbai. “Two vehicles are available per ward for a 12-hour shift for collection of dry waste. The drivers are given a route map designed by the respective ward officer and assistant engineer (SWM). As per the routes, the vehicles will make the rounds of all the streets at least twice a week. The garbage collected is deposited at the ward-level segregation centre, where ragpickers and scavengers rummage through it for items of recyclable value. Earlier, when we could not deploy vehicles for collection of dry waste alone, ragpickers searched for recyclable materials in unsegregated waste,” the official said.

According to the Greater Mumbai Cleanliness and Sanitation Bylaws of 2006, individuals are fined Rs 100, while housing societies (bulk generators) are fined Rs 500 for failing to deliver segregated waste in separate bins. If bio-degradable or dry waste is not delivered in a segregated manner, a fine of Rs 100 is levied in both cases.

alison.saldanha@expressindia.com

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