New to the City: ‘Mumbai is like a strict mother’

Written by Mythreyee Ramesh | Published:November 30, 2016 5:55 am
Mahek Chhaya. Mahek Chhaya.

When Mahek Chhaya (25) moved to Mumbai again, after a brief stint in the city a few years ago, little did she expect of her experience to be vastly different. While Mahek is still charmed by the romantic air of the city, living on her own has exposed her to the various other shades, and has thrown her in situations that she would not have experienced as a student. “The city is like a strict mother,” said Mahek, a communication professional.
Having spent her childhood in Delhi, Mahek and her family had to move to Ahmedabad, just before she started college. Describing the capital city as a “spacious, green heaven,” she says she most definitely misses not bumping into people while walking in Delhi.

What she likes:
“You are never out of options in Mumbai. There is also something very unique about the city’s vibe, the way it never loses charm. You never get bored in the city. Even if you are bored, there is a place to nurture your boredom,” says Mahek, in a happy tone. She describes how she walks past Oberoi Mall in Malad every day, to reach her workplace and how every time she is charmed by the vibe exuded by the road and the mall. She also likes the fact that the city has thrown her in situations, like no other, that has helped her grow as a person. The best thing about the city, she says is how it has a place for every mood and how it embraces everyone as its own.

What she dislikes:
If Mumbai is a cosmopolitan city, Malad East, where Mahek stays, is a place of the Victorian times, she says. “Its a whole different world. Not once did I pay attention to some place like this. Travel is a problem, people are very judgmental and the whole place has shades of old air. Every day you go to sleep with a new problem,” Mahek elaborates. She also narrates the “Big Bai Problem” of the city and how it is a bubble that one cannot burst. “I have come to accept that I am my own maid. We need to deal with our own work, our own needs, and somehow that is a big botheration in the city,” says Mahek.