Mumbai tourist spot: Land’s end in day, lover’s point at night

Located near Nariman point, this sightseers’ stop offers a unique panoramic view.

Written by Rohit Alok | Mumbai | Published:November 28, 2016 2:20 am
The advent of camera phones has hit photographers hard at Marine Drive.  Ganesh Shirsekar The advent of camera phones has hit photographers hard at Marine Drive. Ganesh Shirsekar

At the southern tip of Marine Drive, the promenade extends further and meets the sea. This tiny linear patch is considered by many the most photogenic spot in the island city. With tourists turning on their heels to be clicked separately with Cuffe Parade highrises, the National Centre for the Performing Arts (NCPA), the queen necklace and Walkeshwar outline all in the backdrop, this spot is unlike any other in the city.

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What is usually known as ‘land’s end’ during the day turns into Mumbai’s most renowned Lover’s Point after sunset. Located near Nariman point, this sightseers’ stop offers a unique panoramic view.

“We know of this point through movies like Munnabhai or Wake up Sid. They show us this view and we’ve travelled all the way to take new pictures that we can put up as our display pictures on Facebook,” said 19-year-old Pawan Gupta, who resides in Nalasopara, at least 90 km from the Nariman Point’s land’s end. Gupta was accompanied with two friends. Visitors here would be swarmed by various hawkers, professional photographers who carry printers and even women selling balloons and bubbles.

51-year-old photographer Nihalshree Choudhary said that with the advent of cellphone cameras, business for him has taken a hit.

“I have to resort to being a guide here to engage people and then snap them for Rs 30 per photo. That is the strategy a few of us have devised here. The topic now is the 26/11 attacks. Since a lot of the visitors are tourists, we entice them with the route the terrorists took,” he said.

Two terrorists left the dingy at the tetrapodes near the Oberoi-Trident hotels on the fateful night of November 26, 2008, from where it was carried by the wind to Badhwar Park, where it was later spotted.

“We would start pointing from Cuffe Parade and then to Colaba and the Gateway of India to make the tourists imagine the movements of the terrorists that night eight years ago. It is unfortunate but one of our last ways to earn money. Sundays prove to be the most profitable day,” added Choudhary.

Selling Channa Chor at this land’s end since 1995, Raj Sharma (42) said that visitors mainly debate over just one question. “Kya Bombay ka anth hain ya (is this Bombay’s end or) starting point,” said Sharma, claiming to have never heard the debate come to a proper conclusion.