Ganpati immersions leave behind 2,033 metric tonnes of garbage

42,935 idols immersed across the city on the last day, says BMC

| Mumbai | Published: September 11, 2014 12:45 am
Around 700 children from 13 schools, as well as college students, volunteered to collect garbage from Juhu beach and Girgaum chowpatty.(Source: IR photo by Ganesh Shirsekar) Around 700 children from 13 schools, as well as college students, volunteered to collect garbage from Juhu beach and Girgaum chowpatty. (Source: IR photo by Ganesh Shirsekar)

Following the last day of Ganesh idols immersions on September 8, nearly 2,033 metric tonnes of garbage was collected from various parts of the city by the civic body. Dadar (G/North), followed by Andheri (West) and Oshiwara (K/West) generated maximum amount of garbage, according to data available with the BMC’s solid waste management (SWM) department.

Most of the waste collected was bio-degradable ‘nirmalya’, consisting flowers and food products, said BMC officials.

“Waste collected is segregated and the biodegrabale waste is turned into compost at each ward and used by the gardens department, while the non-decomposable waste makes its way to dump yards,” said a senior BMC official.

On the last day, a total of 42,935 Ganesh idols were immersed at various locations in the city, stated BMC data. At Dadar, around 406 metric tonnes of waste was collected, while at Andheri (west) and Oshiwara it was around 335.5 metric tonnes. Other areas, where the waste amounted to over 100 tonnes were F/South (102 MT), R Central (176 MT) and M/East (105.5 MT)wards, comprising Parel, Gorai, Borivali East and Chembur areas.

“The remains of idols are thrown back into the sea to keep with the religious sentiments, while the melted POP is transported to dump yards,” said a K-West ward official.

Meanwhile, the least amount of garbage collected after the visarjan was from P/North (11.040 MT) and E (11.5MT) wards, comprising Malad and Byculla areas.

After the immersions, many organisations and student volunteers helped collect and segregate waste at beaches and lake sides. Around 700 children from 13 schools, as part of the Children’s Movement for Civic Awareness (CMCA) drive, as well as college students volunteered to collect garbage from Juhu and Aksa beaches and Girgaum chowpatty. “We collected parts of idols, floral waste, pieces of wood, thermocol decorations, gutkha, scores of slippers and even a pair of jeans from the beaches. We mainly gather garbage in piles and only segregate the floral nirmalaya and keep it in big pot provided by the BMC, otherwise, there is no real segregation practised while collecting the garbage,” said Vinodini Lulla, trustee, CMCA.
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