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Day-II of Mood Indigo: Rajasthani, Mexican in an equal music

Rajdeep Sardesai questioned where the journalism, that took public interest into account, was.

| Mumbai | Published: December 28, 2014 1:19 am
(From left) The Barmer Boys opened the music festival on Saturday; Los Dorados added the Mexican flavour to it. (From left) The Barmer Boys opened the music festival on Saturday; Los Dorados added the Mexican flavour to it.

Music from Rajasthan and Mexico resonated in the halls of IIT Bombay on day two of its annual cultural festival, Mood Indigo. Barmer Boys, known for their Rajastani folk and Sufi music, opened the music festival and the band Los Dorados added the Mexican flavour to the music on Saturday.

Claps, whistles and an encore followed the performance by Barmer Boys led by Manga ‘Mangey’ Khan (vocals, harmonium) with the twin percussive punch of Rais Khan (morchang, bhapang, beat-boxing) and Tarif Khan (on dholak). The animated Rais won the hearts of the crowd with his beatboxing and an encore after the performers broke into the famous ‘Mast Kalandar’.

“I’m from Rajasthan and I love how they made the folk songs of our culture so upbeat through beatboxing and funky tunes. It’s like a mix of two cultures, Rajasthani folk and our preferred modern upbeat music,” said Priyakshi Agarwal, from a college in Kharghar.

Indo-Mexican music band Los Dorados incorporated Lata Mangeshkar’s ‘Wada na tod’ in the jazz-rock music form that they are known for.

For the 11-year-old band, performing for the first time out of Mexico, it is “inspiring to be in India — a land of music”. “Our music identifies with youngsters as it is free-minded like young people, with energetic tunes. Having performed in a closed space in Delhi, performing open air is very exciting. We draw energy form the crowd and it is nice to play for young students. Since the audience may not be too used to our music, we play it with our heart and I’m sure they are open to hearing different kinds of music. We feel like the Beatles when they first came to India, not knowing if we have a dedicated audience,” said Carlos Maldonado, who plays bass.

Day two saw much more than music with ‘muggle’ college students playing the Harry Potter inspired ‘Quidditch’, ‘walking on water’ using Zorbas and racing around parts of the campus on Segways (two-wheeled, self-balancing, battery-powered electric vehicles).

There was also a packed hall for journalist Rajdeep Sardesai’s interactive session, where he spoke on the “corporatisation, politicisation and sensationalisation” of news, need for responsible reporting on social media and the media’s “cheerleading” attitude towards Modi among other things.

Besides these events Trashion, a recycled material fashion competition and the elimination round of “Desi Beats”, the Bollywood dancing competition, drew crowds on Saturday.

From Rajdeep Sardesai’s speech:

In his talk, Rajdeep Sardesai questioned where the journalism, that took public interest into account, was. He said there were several news channels that had “nautanki journalists; who liked to hear the sound of their own voice”. He added, “My old channel, much like other news channels, are controlled by corporates who have vested interests. It can never run a story against India’s richest man.”

mumbai.newsline@expressindia.com

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