BMC completes repairs on 18 bridges, tenders for rest 3 soon

Tenders for city bridges, JSS bridge, Keshavsoot bridge, and Curry Road, will be placed before the civic standing committee for approval.

Written by Tanushree Venkatraman | Mumbai | Updated: May 16, 2014 7:36 pm
Repair work at Dindoshi bridge and Bandra-Khar flyover caused traffic jam on Western Express highway on Tuesday. Repair work at Dindoshi bridge and Bandra-Khar flyover caused traffic jam on Western Express highway on Tuesday.

Of the 21 bridges for which repair works were undertaken by the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) in October after a delay of two years, only three bridges remain for resurfacing. Tenders for these island city bridges, JSS bridge, Keshavsoot bridge, and Curry Road bridge, will soon be placed before the civic standing committee for approval and the corporation expects to start work on these after the coming monsoon season.

In the interim, to ensure a smooth ride on the remaining three stretches, the corporation says it will exercise vigilance in pothole-repairs and other maintenance works during the monsoon season. The 21 bridges slated for revamp and repairs, are nearly 100 years of age and have been pending repairs since the standing technical advisory committee (STAC) inspected all bridges of Mumbai in 2011.

“We started work immediately after monsoons last year. The new resurfaced bridges come with a guarantee period of a minimum five years. The tenders for resurfacing the other three bridges will be tabled before the standing committee soon and work orders should be issued for October. Till then, we will continue with maintenance work,” said S O Kori, chief engineer, bridges department.

The BMC has spent nearly Rs 30 crores on the work for these major bridges spread across the island city, eastern and western suburbs. The highest allocation of funds was for the Mahalaxmi bridge where the corporation spent about Rs 4.86 cr followed by the Lower Parel Bridge which cost roughly Rs 3.53 cr.

The bridges revamp project has caused considerable inconvenience for commuters in various parts of Mumbai, especially when work was executed on the Byculla bridge and Kemps Corner bridge, both of which cost the corporation around Rs 2 crores respectively. In the resurfacing and repair work, the civic bridges department has employed the latest mastic-asphalt technology to create more durable surfaces. The use of this material was made mandatory in 2012 based on STAC’s recommendations for the civic roads and bridges department.

“The mechanised mastic-asphalt is similar to cement but has bitumine content which makes it a tougher material for potholes to form as compared to other materials,” Kori added.
tanushree.venkatraman@expressindia.com

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