Awaiting MoEF approvals, sewage disposal project pushed to next year

While the construction of the sewage treatment plant at Colaba is set to begin this month, work on six other plants at Worli, Bandra, Versova, Malad, Ghatkopar and Bhandup will not begin this year.

By: Express News Service | Mumbai | Published:October 10, 2016 2:08 am

After the BMC’s ambitious Coastal Road project, the Mumbai Sewage Disposal Project II (MSDP II) too is likely to be pushed to the next year, owing to delay in nod from the Ministry of Environment and Forests. Following a meeting in New Delhi on September 30, MoEF officials have decided to formulate discharge norms for all the coastal states, instead of giving the norms for MSDP II and approving it.

This means, civic officials said, that the approval of the discharge norms, which was expected in a month’s time, would now take several months. “During the discussion, the environment department officials felt that giving discharge norms to every state would be cumbersome. They decided that they would devise uniform norms for all the coastal states, and this will take at least three months,” a senior civic official said.

While the construction of the sewage treatment plant at Colaba is set to begin this month, work on six other plants at Worli, Bandra, Versova, Malad, Ghatkopar and Bhandup will not begin this year. “The project plan for the plants in Bandra and Worli have been completed and we just need the final norms for discharge into coastal water from the CPCB before we can begin the tendering process for the projects. We had expected the approvals to take a month at best. But now we will have to wait until the MoEF releases the norms for everyone. It is unlikely that the work will begin this year,” the official said.

While the plant at Lovegrove in Worli is likely to be a multi-storeyed structure that will process around 500 million litres of sewage on a daily basis to yield around 400 million litres of water, the one at Bandra Reclamation will yield around 320 million litres of treated water after processing 400 million litres of sewage.
The city will receive an additional 2,130 million litres of water from the seven sewage treatment plants in the second phase of the project, increasing the the drinking water supply. The non-potable water that will undergo tertiary treatment can be re-used by commercial users and even housing societies. It will also be available for use in fire hydrants, maintaining open spaces and for the railways.

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