Facing nurse exodus,hospitals look south

With government hospitals on a hiring spree,city private hospitals are facing a severe dearth of trained nurses and are forced to look at south India.

Written by Arshad Ali | Kolkata | Published:May 4, 2012 6:12 am

With government hospitals on a hiring spree,city private hospitals are facing a severe dearth of trained nurses and are forced to look at south India.

“As many as 22 nurses of my hospital put in their papers in a single day. To avoid inconveniencing the patients,we are now hiring from south India. Training these nurses,however,is a time-consuming process,” said Partha Sarathi Modak,administration head,Mission of Mercy Hospital.

He said apart from the career prospects and job security at a government hospital,low work pressure was an attraction.

“I asked them that when the pay was as good,then why were they leaving. Some of them said they wanted to work at a government hospital as the work pressure there was a lot less and they could afford to be a bit laid back,” Modak said.

Dr Udayan Lahiry,CEO,Medica Superspecialty Hospital,too,said they were facing a similar situation and felt a service a notice period should be made mandatory. “We had foreseen this situation and had overstaffed ourselves to deal with this problem. An easy solution would be if the WB Nursing Council served a notice before taking away our trained hands,” he said.

Arindam Banerjee,general manager,Columbia Asia Hospital,however,said their attrition rate was relatively low — a two per cent — as they had “managed to keep the employees happy’.

Tapas Mukherjee,administration head,Desun said he was trying his best to deal with the situation. “There had been a day recently when 20 nurses resigned in one day from our hospital. We have no option but to hire nurses from Kerala where there are a large number of government recognised nursing institutes. We keep a buffer to keep ourselves prepared to tackle a shortfall of nurses,” he said,adding that they had a unique strategy to counter the circumstances.

“We put a senior Bengali nurse as the in-charge of the department. Compared to the young nurses,the senior nurses with a family are less prone to job-hopping,” Mukherjee said.

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