Sunday, Sep 21, 2014

That Indian Jazz Guy

There are few musicians who balance innovative and entertaining hooks at one time, and this quartet playing a piece from New York-based Indian origin musician Mahanthappa’s last album Gamak in a YouTube video, seems to be the answer. Source: Jimmy Katz There are few musicians who balance innovative and entertaining hooks at one time, and this quartet playing a piece from New York-based Indian origin musician Mahanthappa’s last album Gamak in a YouTube video, seems to be the answer. Source: Jimmy Katz
Written by Suanshu Khurana | Posted: August 11, 2014 11:34 am

The sound of Rudresh Mahanthappa’s saxophone crackles with strange energy. The moment he begins to blow life into the single reed mouthpiece of the instrument, the quartet he is playing with comes alive. There is that typical bebop style intact, but then there is also some raagdaari in all of it. David Fiuczynski’s fretless double-necked guitar joins in, sometimes like a sitar and sometimes like a guitar.

At many points, the arrangements are like conversations — specific responses to each other without stepping on anyone’s toes. Is this jazz being blended with other forms? It’s difficult to miss touches of Chinese music and splashes of metal. A few hearing sessions the answers seem to crawl closer — these are interesting harmonic structures which seem to “redefine the possibilities of what jazz can be.” There are no patches. With such difference of genres, everything falls in place like it should.

There are few musicians who balance innovative and entertaining hooks at one time, and this quartet playing a piece from New York-based Indian origin musician Mahanthappa’s last album Gamak in a YouTube video, seems to be the answer. Gamak literally means a precise technique of ornamentation in Indian classical music. For Mahanthappa, “it is the beauty of melody as it occurs all over the world.”

In the current jazz scene, Mahanthappa has been touring the world with some of the finest jazz names. He is mostly known in India for his collaborations with Grammy-nominated jazz musician Vijay Iyer and his work with jazz legend Bunky Green.

“I see my music as an expression of myself. While it is a hybrid of Indian classical music and jazz, for me it is more an expression of my experience as a child of Indian immigrants brought up in America,” says Mahanthappa, who like many other Indian kids, was dealing with questions of nationality, ethnicity, and heritage. Growing up in an Indian home in Colorado, not really speaking Kannada — his mother tongue — waking up to devotional music played by his mother and listening to ’70s and ’80s rock mixed with a bit of Segovia and Chuck Mangione and jazz, it was a mixed musical experience for Mahanthappa. “People often assumed I was an expert on Indian music because of my name and the colour of my skin, even though I was listening to the same Western music as everyone. I became intimidated by Indian music and kind of avoided it,” says Mahanthappa. It wasn’t until continued…

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