Saturday, Oct 25, 2014

DMRC to send engineers to training school in Malaysia

DMRC aims to have its own engineers do all the Metro tunnelling work in the future. (Archive) DMRC aims to have its own engineers do all the Metro tunnelling work in the future. (Archive)
Written by Siddhartha Gupta | New Delhi | Posted: April 28, 2014 12:51 am

The Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) is planning to set up a Tunnel Training School in the capital to equip its own engineers with skills to supervise and monitor tunnelling operations that are part of DMRC projects, a DMRC spokesperson said.

The supervision and monitoring is currently done by foreign engineers, who are brought to the country by the contractors DMRC hires to execute the tunnelling operations, the DMRC spokesperson said.

The spokesperson said DMRC wanted to have the monitoring and supervision done entirely by its own engineers in the future.

According to DMRC, Phase-III project involves intense tunnelling activity on 53 km of a total length of 143 km being constructed underground. The deepest point is 29 metres below the ground under existing Hauz Khas Metro station.

Thirty-five Tunnel Boring Machines (TBM) are being used for the project.

“For now, we have decided to send a batch of 10 engineers to Tunnel Training Academy in Kuala Lumpur next month for a 15-day training and skill upgradation programme. We will be sending more of our engineers to Malaysia in the coming months and a schedule for the same has also been chalked out,” Anuj Dayal, chief spokesperson of DMRC, said.

According to a DMRC spokesperson, processes essential to TBM operations such as cutting wheel erection, gap filling/grouting and shotcreting are to be understood perfectly if an operation had to be supervised.

“And these processes are best understood when viewed from close quarters at the time when they are under progress. The Malaysian academy has simulators which will facilitate that,” the spokesperson said.

Dayal said DMRC engineers at the Malaysian Tunnel Training Academy will be able to get hands-on training in a simulated underground tunnel environment with audio-visual 3-D tools.

“They will feel as if they are working inside a TBM. They will erect tunnelling segments using wireless controls. They will be able to construct tunnel archs in training laboratories. They will also be exposed to working TBM models and the use of rock-and-soil cutting tools,” he said.

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