Dhrupad goes West

He is proficient in 20 musical instruments and world music,but dhrupad holds a special place for Georg Gratzer.

Written by Garima Mishra | Published:January 6, 2012 3:13 am

He is proficient in 20 musical instruments and world music,but dhrupad holds a special place for Georg Gratzer. “Whether I am on tour with a jazz band,a world music band or a church organ player,I begin with dhrupad practise,” says the Austrian artiste,who has been learning Indian classical music from Delhi-based Gundecha Brothers since 2009.

The founder of various ensembles,including Amridan (world music),Carysfort Stories (contemporary pop) and Balg-und Holzgebläse,Gratzer is now working on a fusion album in collaboration with Mumbai-based Kanakia Art Foundation. To launch in India in December 2012,this will bring together notes of dhrupad with western classical music. “The music will be inspired by my journeys through Europe,South America and Asia,” says Gratzer,who has performed across the world,from Paris to Peking and Hamburg to Hong Kong.

Words of support come from his gurus. While Ramakant Gundecha points out that they tried to expose him to the subtle nuances of Indian music,Umakant Gundecha says,“Since he is already deeply connected with western music,he could grasp and realise the intensity of ‘swar’ and ‘shruti’ in dhrupad music.”

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