Delhi Underground: Cat-naps

As Central Delhi buzzed with preparations for International Yoga Day, the heart of the city was locked down the night before with police officers posted at critical points.

By: Express News Service | New Delhi | Published:June 22, 2015 2:33 am
international yoga day, DU, yoga day, yoga at rajpath, yoga for life, narendra modi, modi initiative, PM Modi, delhi news, city news, local news, Indian Express Some practitioners enjoy the early morning calm at Rajpath on Yoga Day. (Source: Express Photo by Amit Mehra )

As Central Delhi buzzed with preparations for International Yoga Day, the heart of the city was locked down the night before with police officers posted at critical points. But on more than one occasion, sheer exhaustion got the better of them with some officers seen taking cat-naps in benches in bus stops. One officer said, “We’ve been out since morning and we’ll be here till sunrise. A short nap helps in recharging the batteries.”

First preference
Organisers of Yoga Day were left confused over who to distribute the most t-shirts to — performers or volunteers. With limited stock of t-shirts provided to them, organisers had to “convince” the volunteers that it would be the “performers” who would first get the fist preference. Volunteers were told they would get t-shirts if some stock is left after the event. Disgruntled over the issue, a volunteer argued, “We all doing all the work but someone else gets the good treatment.”

All out for yoga
Saturday night saw police deployment in Central and South Delhi like never before, leaving many returning from parties and clubs rather confused. “Has something happened?” many asked when stopped by a small band of police officers at a usually deserted checkpost near Greater Kailash I. A police officer replied, “Yes, it’s Yoga Day. Go home and wake up early.”

Angry commuters
As thousands assembled at Rajpath for International Yoga Day, traffic police incharge of diverting vehicles were at the receiving end of complaints from angry commuters. Even as they tried their best to calm down a few, one man was heard saying, “Yoga mein toh waise hi body ko twist karke alag alag asanas karne padhte hai. Aap log humein ghuma ghuma ke pareshan kar rahein ho. (Some of the postures in Yoga are complicated. On top of this, you are making us go around so many different routes).”

No stage fright
Addressing sanitation workers from an over-crowded stage at a rally last week, Congress vice-president Rahul Gandhi said, “I am being asked to hurry because the stage is weak and it may collapse. But I will not hurry.” Even as he ended his speech, Rahul made another reference to the stage as he was pushed and shoved. “No matter how much time it takes, how much we sweat and how many stages we break, I do not care. Your demands will be met with,” Rahul said.

Too complicated
Arguing in a case that asked for a stay on admissions to law schools in the country — on grounds that the Common Law Entrance Test (CLAT) 2015 had several errors in it — the senior lawyer told the court that the test was “too complicated”. “I took the test and I failed. I doubt anyone practicing in court can clear this exam,” the lawyer argued. “Are they making lawyers or do they want scientists?” he argued further, claiming that even the judge would be unable to answer questions in the CLAT paper.

Doing minimum
In a move that will in all likelihood affect the pace of work in the Delhi government, senior officials are taking precautions while signing files after they were told to get approval on every “good-for-people” move they suggest from the minister concerned. “Sticking out their neck out over a suggestion that may make life easy for all is not on the priority list right now”, a senior official said.

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