Doctors unite against antibiotic resistance

The group has been named as CAR — Combat Antimicrobial Resistance. A statement issued by the CAR on Thursday said that the group has come into existence to stand united against the growing menace of antibiotic resistance.

By: Express News Service | Chandigarh | Published: September 29, 2017 2:09 am
 Combat Antimicrobial Resistance, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Government Medical College and Hospital, Medical news India, Punjab medical news, national news, latest news, A new group is called CAR — Combat Antimicrobial Resistance. Express

A group has been formed to inform people about the dangers and consequences of improper use of medicines. The group will also include doctors from the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research and Government Medical College and Hospital in Sector 32.

The group has been named as CAR — Combat Antimicrobial Resistance. A statement issued by the CAR on Thursday said that the group has come into existence to stand united against the growing menace of antibiotic resistance.

“With CAR, we aim to spread the meaning and impact of antibiotic resistance in simple terms to the masses. We aim to discuss the problems arising from the irrational use of drugs and ways to contain the same. We will spread the message of the growing resistance and the loss that the patient has to suffer because of it. We aim to sensitise the prescribers and the consumers so that they think twice before writing a particular antibiotic to a patient or before buying one. In short, we aim to hit and hit hard at the grass-root level,” the statement said.

Antibiotic resistance refers to the situation when bacteria does not respond to the drugs designed to kill them.

“In the past few years, many world authorities like the World Health Organisation (WHO), the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) and others have shown concerns regarding the dangerous pace at which antibiotic resistance is increasing. Currently, over 700,000 deaths each year are attributed to drug resistance. In India, an additional two million lives can be lost by 2050 due to drug resistance,” said the statement.

“With this pace, there is a great threat looming over us that we may return to a time when simple infections were also often fatal. Further, the resistant organisms, popularly called the ‘superbugs’, will leave no antibiotic of any use.”

Dr Vikas Gautam, additional professor, department of microbiology, PGIMER, who is also the president of the group, said they would organise various initiatives initially in the Tricity which later would be extended to the country and abroad.

For all the latest Chandigarh News, download Indian Express App

    Live Cricket Scores & Results