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‘Blood pressure,cholesterol control help prevent diabetes’

“Blood pressure and cholesterol levels are more significant to control diabetes than just blood sugar control,” said Dr R Muralidharan,endocrinologist at Fortis Hospital in Mohali at a workshop held in the hospital to observe the World Diabetes Day.

Written by Express News Service | Mohali | Published: November 23, 2009 6:58 am

“Blood pressure and cholesterol levels are more significant to control diabetes than just blood sugar control,” said Dr R Muralidharan,endocrinologist at Fortis Hospital in Mohali at a workshop held in the hospital to observe the World Diabetes Day. Around 100 former patients of Dr Muralidharan were invited for the workshop,where a glucometer and BP check was also conducted.

Dr Muralidharan discussed about the magnitude of problem of diabetes and the health risks caused by poor control of diabetes and significant protection offered against all diabetic complications by regular monitoring and optimum control of diabetes. In addition to drug treatment,the significant contribution of positive lifestyle changes through healthy diet and regular physical activity on prevention of diabetes and its complications were emphasised.

Discussing about the impact of diabetes on the kidney,Dr Sanjeev Mehrotra,urologist and renal transplant specialist,gave an insightful presentation on the current scenario of the renal transplant. He focussed on the advantages of a kidney transplant as compared to dialysis.

“It is appalling that there are approximately 2 lakh new cases of permanent kidney failure every year,significant number of which is because of diabetes related problems,of which only 4,000 manage to undergo renal transplants at 50 centres in the country. It is important to understand that despite the legal aspect of undergoing a kidney transplant,there is no comparison between the advantage of a transplant and dialysis,” he added.

Dr Arun Kochar,cardiologist,shared facts about the impact of diabetes on heart diseases. “Studies have estimated that two out of three diabetic patients are likely to die of heart disease or stroke. Diabetic patient tend to develop heart disease and stroke at a much younger age than people without diabetes. Similarly,it is seen that women with diabetes are at a much higher risk of developing heart disease and stroke than men. However,if we get our blood sugar checked frequently and keep it under control,visit our doctor regularly,eat a healthy diet,avoid tobacco,have regular exercise regime and take medication punctually then diabetes and its complications could be reduced to the bare minimum,” he advised.

Talking about the harmful impact of diabetes on the eyes,Dr Sandeep Janjua,ophthalmologist,said,“Diabetes is a multi-system disorder involving the eyes in the form of Diabetic Retinopathy (DR),which is a leading cause of blindness among the productive age group of below 55 years. It has been documented that 20 years after the onset of DR,nearly all patients with Type-1 DM and more than 60 per cent of those with Type II DM will have some degree of retinopathy. Screening for DR should be mandatory for all diabetics as it is now assuming the form of an epidemic in India ,” he added.

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