Thursday, Oct 30, 2014

India demands block $1 trillion WTO trade deal on customs rules

WTO Director-General Roberto Azevêdo has said that despite intensive consultations, trade body's 160 members have not been able to find a solution to bridge the gap on the adoption of TFA. WTO Director-General Roberto Azevêdo has said that despite intensive consultations, trade body's 160 members have not been able to find a solution to bridge the gap on the adoption of TFA.
Posted: August 1, 2014 8:45 am

 

The WTO Director-General Roberto Azevêdo said on Thursday that despite intensive consultations, the world trade body’s 160 members have not been able to find a solution that would allow them to bridge the gap on the adoption of the protocol on the Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA).

 

Proponents of the deal had estimated that the TFA meant to ease customs rules worldwide could add $1 trillion to the global GDP and create over 20 million jobs. The main opposition had come from India, which said it will not support the TFA protocol unless there is a credible assurance and visible outcomes on the other key elements of the December 2013 Ministerial decisions in Bali, Indonesia – that is, to find a permanent solution on public stock holding for food security for the hundreds of millions of poor people as well as a package for least developed countries.

 

Just hours before the end of the July 31 deadline to adopt the TFA protocol, Azevêdo also urged members “to reflect long and hard on the ramifications of this setback”, adding that during August he will be travelling and talking to members to discuss how things should proceed.

 

India had on Thursday said the July 31 deadline for TFA is not inviolable, despite tenuous support for its case for bundling of TFA with the food security issue.

 

Azevêdo, who had been exploring whether there are any possible ways that the members might find convergence, said, “Of course it is true that everything remains in play until midnight — but at present there is no workable solution on the table, and I have no indication that one will be forthcoming.”

 

“I am very sorry to report that despite these efforts I do not have the necessary elements that would lead to me to conclude that a breakthrough is possible. We got closer — significantly closer — but not quite there,” he added.

 

While visiting US leaders – US secretary of state John Kerry and US commerce secretary Penny Pritzker – who have had meetings with senior Indian ministers during the day hoped for a last-minute breakthrough,  official sources here said New Delhi’s stance is unchanged but added that the country’s latest statement to the council suggested a way to end the deadlock.

 

Stressing that “substance” rather than “process” was paramount, New Delhi said a permanent solution to the issue of public stock-holding for food security was integral to the Bali ministerial deal, sources said, quoting the country’s revised statement.  India also claimed that failure to meet the July 31 deadline will not mean that the Bali package would collapse.

 

On Thursday, continued…

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