GST bill: Consensus eludes on jurisdiction over assessees

The government aims to roll out GST, which will subsume excise, service tax and local levies, from April next year.

By: PTI | New Delhi | Updated: November 23, 2016 1:53 pm
gst, gst council meet, arun jaitley, gst news, gst rates, gst rate structure, business news, economy news Union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley. (PTI Photo)

The Centre and states on Sunday failed to reach a consensus on who will control which set of assessees under GST.
The GST Council will meet again on November 25 to work out the modalities. The informal meeting of Union Finance Minister and his state counterparts was called to break the political deadlock on sharing of administrative control under the proposed goods and services tax (GST) regime.

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“The meeting has remained incomplete. Discussions will continue on November 25,” Finance Minister Arun Jaitley told reporters after the meeting. Today’s meeting, which came ahead of the formal meeting of the all powerful GST Council on November 25, was held after the Centre and states were deadlocked over the issue at two previous meetings.

The government aims to roll out GST, which will subsume excise, service tax and local levies, from April next year
Officers of both central and state governments will meet tomorrow and try to workout a solution. States like Uttarakhand, West Bengal, Uttar Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Kerala have insisted on exclusive control over small businesses, which earn less than Rs 1.5 crore in annual revenue, for both goods and services.

They feel states have infrastructure deployment at grassroot level and small taxpayers are familiar with state authorities. The Centre, on the other hand, is unagreeable to the demand as it wants single registration mechanism for ease to service taxpayers.

Instead of horizontally splitting the taxpayers — tax payers with Rs 1.5 crore revenue with states and those above
with Centre — it has proposed to divide entire taxpayer base vertically, wherein taxpayers are divided between the Centre and states in a fixed proportion.

As a compromise, it is willing to give states administrative power over 2/3rd of the taxpayer base, with service tax continuing to be administered by Centre. An official said the informal meeting was held sans civil servants to arrive at a political solution.